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Dog Weight Calculator: Estimate Your Dog’s Future Size

Get an estimate of your puppy's adult size, weight, and height with our dog weight calculator! Plus, track their growth over time with the puppy weight chart.

Welcome to our dog weight calculator page. 

Are you a new dog owner, or just curious about your pup’s growth? If so, you’re in the right place. 

We’ve created a new tool on our website that will help you predict your dog’s future size, weight,  and height. And it’s all available to you with just a few clicks. 

The dog size calculator is an easy-to-use tool that allows you to input your puppy ‘s current weight and breed, and receive an estimate of their future adult size. It ‘s perfect for anyone who wants to understand their dog’s growth and development. 

So, don’t wait any longer, try out our puppy weight calculator and discover how big your furry friend will be!

What Is a Dog Weight Calculator? 

What is a Dog Weight Calculator - dog size calculator

A Dog Weight Calculator is a tool that can help you predict how big your puppy will be when it grows up. This calculator uses a formula that takes into account the puppy’s age, weight and breed. The formula is simple: Adult Weight = (Puppy Weight / Puppy Age in Weeks) x 52. This means that if you know your puppy’s current weight and age, you can use the calculator to estimate how much it will weigh as an adult.

The calculator can be used for any breeed of dog. Some calculators also provide a chart that shows how fast your puppy will grow, so you can see when it will grow the most. This can be helpful for monitoring your puppy’s weight and making sure it is healthy. Some calculators may also consider other factors like the puppy’s body condition and muscle mass.

Keep in mind that the results generated by the dog size calculator are usually given in ranges . This is because there is some variation in size within each breed and individual dog. 

So, it’s just an estimate, and you should use it as a guide to help you monitor your dog’s growth.

How to Use Our Dog Size Calculator?

Using our puppy weight calculator is very easy. To find out how much your puppy will weigh as an adult, just do the following:

  • Enter your puppy’s age in weeks, days, or months
  • Enter your puppy’s current weight in pounds or kilograms
  • Click the calculate button

Our dog weight calculator makes it simple to predict your puppy’s weight. Just input your puppy’s current weight and age, and our calculator will estimate their adult weight. Keep in mind that your puppy ‘s final weight can be affected by many factors, so the results will show a range.

In addition, our dog size calculator will also tell you the type of breed your dog is. For example, it will tell you if your dog is a toy dog (like a Yorkshire Terrier or Chihuahua),  a small dog (like a Beagle or Dachshund), a medium dog (like a Samoyed or Labrador Retriever), a large dog (like an Alaskan Malamute or Bernese Mountain Dog), or a giant dog (like a Great Dane or Bullmastiff).

How Does Our Puppy Weight Calculator Works?

Dog Weight Calculator Estimate Your Dog's Future Size

Our puppy weight calculator is easy to use. It uses a formula that tells you how much your puppy will weigh as an adult. 

The formula is: Adult weight = (Puppy weight / Puppy age in weeks) x 52. 

We use 52 because there are 52 weeks in one year. Usually, dogs become adults when they are one year old, but this can be different for different types of dogs. Small dogs can be full grown by 8 months, while big dogs can take up to 16 months. 

You can also use a calculator that is specific to the breed or sex of your dog, but our dog weight calculator only needs the puppy’s current weight (in grams, dekagrams, kilograms, ounces, pounds, stones) and age (in days, weeks, months).

How to Interpret Results From a Puppy Size Calculator?

To interpret the results from a puppy size calculator, you can use the formula provided by the calculator to estimate your puppy’s adult weight. This formula takes into account your pup’s current weight and age, as well as breed size to give you an estimate of what to expect. 

However, it ‘s important to keep in mind that these estimates are just that, estimates, and other factors such as nutrition and exercise can affect a puppy’s growth rate. 

Additionally, the calculator may provide a range of possible adult weights, and it is important to note that the puppy ‘s actual adult weight may fall outside of this range. It’s always best to consult with a veterinarian to monitor your puppy’s growth and development.

How Big Will My Puppy Get?

How Fast Do Puppies Gain Weight

It’s hard to estimate how big will your puppy get, but you can use a puppy growth calculator to get a better idea. Our calculator takes into account the current weight and age of your pup. By inputting this information, it can give you an approximate estimate of the adult weight of your puppy. 

It’s important to remember that all puppies grow differently, so this estimate is just that – an estimate. 

While it can be helpful in giving you an idea of how big your puppy will get, it isn’t guaranteed to be accurate. That’s why it’s best to keep up with regular check-ups with your vet – they ‘ll be able to give you a more accurate assessment of how big your pup will become as they get older.

The following are three methods that can help you estimate the adult weight and size of your puppy.

Method One: The Puppy Growth Formula

  • The first and simplest way to estimate your puppy ‘s adult size is to use a basic formula.
  • This is the method that the puppy calculator above uses to make its estimates.
  • The formula is: Adult Size = Current Weight / Age in Weeks × 52.
  • This formula is most accurate for breeds that mature in 12 months (52 weeks), but keep in mind that some breeds mature more quickly or slowly.
  • Large breeds tend to reach their adult weight in 18 months,  while small breeds reach their adult weight in as little as 6-8 months.

Method Two: Refer to The Average Adult Weights for Breed

  • Another way to estimate your puppy’s adult size is to look at the average adult weights for their breed.
  • The American Kennel Club has a comprehensive list of adult size ranges for hundreds of dog breeds, which can be a great resource.
  • For example , small breeds like Pugs typically weigh between 14-18 pounds, while larger breeds like Great Danes can weigh between 110-175 pounds.

Method Three: Check The Parents’ Weight

  • A third method you can use to estimate your puppy’s adult size is to look at the weights of their parents.
  • While other factors like genetics and diet play a role, this can be a reasonably accurate way to estimate  your dog’s adult weight when they are still young.
  • For example, you can average the weights of bothh parents to get an idea of your pup’s adult weight.
  • Keep in mind that female puppies will tend to be closer to the size of their mother, and male puppies will tend to be closer to the size of their father.
  • Ultimately, it’s important to keep in mind that these are just estimates, and your puppy’s actual adult weight may differ. It’s always best to consult with a veterinarian to monitor your puppy’s growth and development.

How Fast Do Puppies Gain Weight?

Dog Weight Calculator Estimate Your Dog's Future Size

A puppy’s growth rate can vary and depend on many things, such as the breed and size. Typically, smaller breeds grow quickly and reach their adult weight at 6-8 months old. Larger breeds may take longer, up to 18 months or 24 months for extra-large breeds. Just like humans, puppies may not grow at a steady pace but may have growth spurts and slower periods. 

If you want to know how much to feed your puppy, try using a calorie calculator to figure out their needs.

The 5 Weight and Height Categories in Dogs

If you are looking for the perfect dog for your family, it is important to know the size and weight of the breed you are considering. 

Dogs come in different sizes and fall into five different weight categories.

Weight Categories in Dogs

  • X-Small breeds: These are the smallest dogs and usually weigh less than 12 pounds. Examples of X-Small breeds include Chihuahuas and Toy Poodles.
  • Small breeds: These dogs weigh between 13-20 pounds. Examples of small breeds include French Bulldogs and Pugs.
  • Medium breeds: These dogs weigh between 21-49 pounds. Examples of medium breeds include Border Collies and Siberian Huskies.
  • Large breeds: These dogs weigh between 50-100 pounds. Examples of large breeds include Doberman Pinschers and Akitas.
  • Giant breeds: These are the largest dogs and usually weighh more than 100 pounds. Examples of giant breeds include Great Danes and Saint Bernards.

Height Categories in Dogs

  • Toy breeds: These are the smallest dogs and usually measure no more than 12 inches tall.
  • Small breeds: These dogs measure no more than 18 inches tall.
  • Medium breeds: These dogs measure no more than 25 inches tall.
  • Large breeds: These dogs measure no more than 30 inches tall.
  • Giant breeds: These are the largest dogs and usually measure no more than 44 inches tall.

By considering the size and weight of the breed you are considering, you can find the perfect fit for your family.

Puppy Weight and Size Chart

Puppy Weight and Size Chart

Toy Breeds Weight and Size Chart

Birth weight Age (weeks)2,5 oz3 oz3,5 oz4 oz4,5 oz5 oz5,5 oz6 oz6,5 oz
1 week3,955,25,76,78,29,29,710,4511,2
2 week5,26,77,29,211,212,713,714,716,2
3 weeks6,28,29,211,214,216,217,718,720,2
4 weeks7,29,711,213,217,219,221,223,224,2
5 weeks8,211,213,215,219,722,224,226,229,2
6 weeks9,212,715,217,722,224,227,230,232,2
7 weeks10,214,717,219,724,727,230,233,235,2
8 weeks11,216,219,221,727,229,233,236,239,2
9 weeks12,217,720,223,229,232,235,239,242,2
10 weeks13,219,222,225,231,234,238,241,245,2
11 weeks14,221,224,227,234,237,240,245,249,2
12 weeks15,222,226,230,237,241,245,249,253,2
13 weeks16,224,228,232,240,244,249,253,257,2
14 weeks17,226,230,234,243,247,249,253,260,2
15 weeks19,228,232,237,246,251,256,261,265,2
16 weeks20,230,234,239,249,254,259,265,270,2
17 weeks21,231,236,241,251,257,262,267,272,2
18 weeks22,233,237,243,254,260,265,271,276,2
19 weeks23,234,239,244,256,262,267,272,277,2
20 weeks24,235,241,246,258,264,270,276,281,2
21 weeks24,236,242,248,260,266,272,278,284,2
22 weeks25,237,243,249,262,268,274,280,286,2
23 weeks26,238,244,250,264,270,276,282,288,2
24 weeks26,239,245,251,265,271,278,284,290,2
          
Adult Weight2 lbs3 lbs3,5 lbs4 lbs5 lbs5,5lbs6 lbs6,5 lbs7 lbs

Toy puppies, also known as small breeds, grow quickly and usually reach their adult weight by eight months of age. Here are some ways you can estimate your puppy’s adult weight:

  • Use a weight chart: If you know your puppy’s birth weight or current weight, you can use a chart to estimate their adult weight. Simply find your puppy ‘s age in the chart, and then look at the corresponding weight for that age. You can also use this chart to estimate your puppy’s weight at different milestones.
  • Double the weight: Another way to estimate your puppy’s adult weight is to take their weight at 6 weeks old, double it, and then double it again. For example, if your 12-week old puppy weighs 24 ounces (1.5lbs), their 6-week weight was probably between 12.5 and 15 ounces. Double thhat to 25-30 ounces, then double it again to 50-60 ounces. To get a more accurate estimate, you can find the average of the two (50+60)/2 = 55 ounces, then divide that by 16 to get the weight in pounds.
  • Convert ounces to pounds or kilograms: If you prefer to work with pounds or kilograms, you can use the conversion formulas. 1 ounce = 0.0625 lbs (16 ounces in 1lbs) and 1 ounce = 0.0283 kg (35.274 ounces in 1 kg).

Keep in mind that these are just estimates and your puppy’s actual adult weight may vary. If you want a more accurate measurement, it’s best to consult with your vet.

Small Breeds Weight and Size Chart

AgeWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbs
8 Weeks1,72,22,73,23,74,2
9 Weeks1,92,533,64,14,7
10 Weeks2,12,73,344,65,2
11 Weeks2,333,64,355,7
12 Weeks2,53,244,75,56,2
13 Weeks2,63,54,35,15,96,7
14 Weeks2,83,74,65,56,37,2
15 Weeks344,95,86,87,7
16 Weeks3,24,25,26,27,28,2
5 Months4,35,77,18,59,811,2
6 Months5,16,78,31011,613,2
7 Months5,87,79,611,513,315,2
8 Months6,8911,113,315,517,7
9 Months7,51012,414,817,319,7
10 Months8,31113,616,31921,7
11 Months9,212,215,218,221,224,2
12 Months1013,216,519,72326,2

If you have a small puppy, you can use this chart to estimate how big they will get when they are fully grown. Here’s how you can use it:

  • Find your puppy’s age or weight: Look for the weight closest to your puppy’s age and go down that column. This will give you an estimate of their weight at 12 months old, which is likely to be their adult weight. For example , if you have a 16-week old puppy that weighs 5lbs, you can expect them to be around 16.3lbs when they are fully grown.
  • Average the weights: If your puppy’s age or weight isn’t on the chart, you can find the average of the two closest weights. For example, if your puppy is 5.5lbs at 16 weeks old, they will likely be between 16.3lbs and 19.5lbs as an adult. To be more accurate, you can finnd the average of the two (16.3 + 19.5)/2 = 17.9lbs.
  • Use growth rate: Another way to estimate your puppy’s adult weight is to calculate their growth rate and multiply it by 52. To find the growth rate, divide your puppy ‘s current weight by their age in weeks. For example, if your puppy weighs 4lbs at 14 weeks old, their growth rate is 4/14 = 0.29. Multiply that by 52 to get 14.86lbs as an adult weight.

Keep in mind that these are just estimates,  and your puppy’s actual adult weight may vary. If you want a more accurate measurement, it’s best to consult with your vet.

Medium Breeds Weight and Size Chart

AgeWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbs
8 Weeks4,24,75,25,76,27,28,2
9 Weeks4,75,35,86,478,19,2
10 Weeks5,25,86,57,17,7910,2
11 Weeks5,76,47,17,88,59,811,2
12 Weeks6,277,78,59,210,712,2
13 Weeks6,77,58,39,11011,613,2
14 Weeks7,28,199,810,712,514,2
15 Weeks7,78,69,610,511,513,315,2
16 Weeks8,29,210,211,212,214,216,2
5 Months11,212,61415,316,719,522,2
6 Months13,214,816,518,119,72326,2
7 Months15,217,11920,822,726,530,2
8 Months17,719,922,124,326,530,835,2
9 Months19,722,124,62729,534,339,2
10 Months21,724,427,129,832,537,843,2
11 Months24,227,230,233,236,242,248,2
12 Months26,229,532,73639,245,752,2

The chart can help you estimate how big your medium breed puppy will be when they are fully grown. Here’s how you can use it:

Using The Chart to Determine Adult Weight

  • To use the chart, find your puppy ‘s age down the left side.
  • Next, match that with your puppy’s current weight.
  • For example, if your puppy is 12 weeks old and weighs 7.5 lbs, follow the column down to the “12-month” row, which in this case is 32.5 lbs. This will give you an estimate of your puppy’s adult weight.

if Your Puppy’s Age or Weight Isn’t on The Chart

  • If your puppy falls between two weights for his age, find the average of the two. For example, if your puppy is 7 lbs at 12-weeks, he will likely weigh between 29.3 and 32.5 lbs as an adult. You can also find the average by adding the two weights and dividing by 2.
  • If your puppy’s age isn’t on the chart, use one of the following methods to calculate his adult weight.
Method 1
  • To use this method, find your puppy’s growth rate by dividing his current weight in lbs by his age in weeks.
  • For example, a puppy that weighs 15 lbs at 5-months (22-weeks) would have a growth rate of 15/22 = 0.68. To find his adult weight, multiply the growth rate by 52 (0.68 x 52 = 35.36).
Method 2
  • To use this method, you ‘ll need to know your puppy’s weight at 14 weeks.
  • Weigh your puppy at 14 weeks, then multiply that by 2.
  • Add that total to half the weight at 14 weeks.
  • For example, a puppy that weighs 12 lbs at 14 weeks would weigh 30lbs as an adult (12*2+6).

Large Breeds Weight and Size Chart

AgeWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbs
8 Weeks9,210,211,212,213,214,215,2
9 Weeks10,311,512,613,714,81617,1
10 Weeks11,512,71415,216,517,719
11 Weeks12,61415,316,718,119,520,8
12 Weeks13,715,216,718,219,721,222,7
13 Weeks14,816,518,119,721,32324,6
14 Weeks1617,719,521,22324,726,5
15 Weeks17,11920,822,724,626,528,3
16 Weeks18,220,222,224,226,228,230,2
5 Months2527,730,533,23638,741,5
6 Months29,532,73639,242,545,749
7 Months3437,741,545,24952,756,5
8 months39,64448,352,757,161,565,8
9 Months44,14953,858,763,668,573,3
10 Months48,65459,364,770,175,580,8
11 Months54,260,266,272,278,284,290,2
12 Months58,765,271,778,284,791,297,7
18 Months8897,7107,5117,2127136,7146,5

Are you trying to figure out how much your large breed puppy will weigh as an adult? Here’s a simple guide to help you:

Using The Chart

  • Start by looking at your puppy’s age on the left side of the chart.
  • Find the column that matches your puppy’s current weight.
  • Follow that column down to the “12-month” row. This will give you an estimate of what your puppy will weigh if he stops growing at that point.

Keep in mind that many large breed dogs continue growing past the 12-month point, so they may weigh more than the estimate given on the chart. For example, if your puppy is 16 weeks old and weighs 22 lbs, the chart estimates that he will weigh 71.5 lbs when he is 12 months old. 

However, if your puppy continues growing until he is 18 months old,  he may weigh up to 107.3 lbs.

If your puppy’s weight falls in between two weights on the chart, simply find the average of the two.

Alternative Methods

Method 1: Use The Below Formula Based on His Growth Rate
  • Current weight ( in lbs ) at 20 weeks divided by his current age in weeks multiplied by 52
  • Use this formula based on his weight at 20 weeks (4.6 months) old.
  • For example, a puppy that weighs 33lbs at 20 weeks old, you would do the following: (33/20) x 52 = Adult weight of 85.8
Method 2: Simply Double His Weight at Six Months Old
  • For example, a dog that weighs 29.3 lbs at 6-months old would weight about 58.6 lbs as an adult.

Giant Breeds Weight and Size Chart

AgeWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbsWeight in lbs
8 Weeks16,217,218,219,220,221,2
9 Weeks18,219,320,521,622,723,8
10 Weeks20,221,522,72425,226,5
11 Weeks22,223,62526,327,729,1
12 Weeks24,225,727,228,730,231,7
13 Weeks26,227,829,531,132,734,3
14 Weeks28,23031,733,535,237
15 Weeks30,232,13435,837,739,6
16 Weeks32,234,236,238,240,242,2
5 Months34,236,338,540,642,744,8
6 Months52,255,558,76265,268,5
7 Months60,26467,771,575,279
8 Months70,274,67983,387,792,1
9 Months78,283,18892,897,7102,6
10 Months86,291,697102,3107,7113,1
11 Months96,2102,2108,2114,2120,2126,2
12 Months104,2110,7117,2123,7130,2136,7
18 Months156,2166175,7185,5195,2205

Determining the adult weight of a giant breed puppy can be tricky. One way to estimate it is by using a growth chart. Here ‘s how:

  • Start with your puppy’s age on the left side of the chart
  • Look for your puppy’s current weight in the chart
  • Follow the column down to the “12-month” row to see the estimated adult weight

For example, if your puppy is 10-weeks old and weighs 25 lbs, the chart shows that the estimated adult weight would be 130 lbs if the puppy stops growing at 12 months.

Keep in mind that many giant breed dogs continue to grow past 12 months. Some may continue growing until they are 18 months old, or even 2-years old. If your puppy ‘s weight falls between two weights for his age on the chart, find the average of the two.

Alternatively, there are a couple of formulas you can use to estimate your puppy’s adult weight:

Method 1

  • Formula: Current weight in lbs at 20 weeks divided by current age in weeks multiplied by 52
  • For a giant breed puppy, it’s best to use this formula based on the weight at 20 weeks (4.6 months) old.
  • For example, if a puppy weighs 45lbs at 20 weeks old, the adult weight would be estimated as follows: (45/20) x 52 = 2.25 x 52 = 117

Method 2

  • Much simpler method for giant breeds. Double the weight of your puppy at 6-months old to determine the likely adult weight.
  • For example, if a puppy weighs 65 lbs at 6-months old, the adult weight would be estimated as 130 lbs.

Mixed Breed Puppy Height Calculator

Mixed breed puppy height calculator

It can be difficult to predict the adult height of a mixed breed puppy without knowing the specific breeds that make up the mix. 

A DNA test, such as Embark, can help determine the genetic makeup of a mixed breed dog and provide more information about its potential size, potential health risks, breed-specific traits, and more. 

Once the specific breeds are determined, a more accurate prediction of adult height can be made by using breed-specific growth charts or a dog size calculator, which take into account the average height of each breed present in the mix. 

By inputting the identified breeds and the puppy ‘s current weight and age, a rough estimate of the puppy’s adult height can be made. 

However, it’s important to keep in mind that even with the specific breeds, the height of the mixed breed dog can be variable and influenced by many factors such as nutrition, genetics and overall health.

How Much Will My Dog Weigh? 

​​Our puppy size calculator can help you predict how big your puppy will get when it’s fully grown. Here’s how it works:

  • We use a simple equation: Adult weight = (Puppy weight / Puppy age in weeks) × 52
  • The number 52 is used because it represents the number of weeks in a year. So, our calculator will give you an estimate of your puppy’s weight when he ‘s one year old.
  • On average, dogs become adults within 12 months. However, this can vary depending on the breed. Some smaller breeds may be fully grown at 8 months, while larger breeds may take up to 16 months to reach their full size.

Based on the results of our dog weight calculator, we can place your puppy into one of the following size categories:

  • Toy dog: less than 12 pounds or 5.4 kg
  • Small dog: 12-22 pounds or 5.4-10 kg
  • Medium dog: 22-57 pounds or 10-25.9 kg
  • Large dog: 57-99 pounds or 25.9-44.9 kg
  • Giant dog: over 99 pounds or over 44.9 kg

It’s worth noting that smaller dogs tend to live longer than larger dogs. For every increase of 4.4 pounds (2 kg) in body weight, a dog ‘s lifespan decreases by one month. So, our dog size calculator can also be used as a tool for estimating your dog’s longevity.

How Big Will My Dog Get in Inches/centimeters?

Your dog ‘s height is mainly determined by its breed. However, you can get an idea of its maximum possible height by using our dog weight chart calculator. Here are the different height categories:

  • Toy dog: Maximum height of 12 inches or 30.5 cm
  • Small dog: Maximum height of 18 inches or 45.7 cm
  • Medium dog: Maximum height of 25 inches or 63.5 cm
  • Large dog: Maximum height of 30 inches or 76.2 cm
  • Giant dog: Maximum height of 44 inches or 111.8 cm

Frequently Asked Questions About Puppy Weight and Height Calculators

Frequently asked questions about dog BMI calculators

The answer to this question is simple and complicated at the same time. The simple answer is that you can look at your dog ‘s parents and get a good idea of how big your puppy will be. The complicated answer is that there are so many factors involved with growth rate and size that it ‘s impossible to say with any certainty how big your puppy will be.

Puppy weight calculators are not 100% accurate, but they will give you an idea of what size your dog should be as an adult. The results from these calculators may vary depending on the type of calculator you use. Some are more accurate than others and some may even take into acount other factors such as gender or health issues that may affect growth rate in young puppies.

The size of your dog can be determined by a number of factors, and is affected by his genetics and how he was raised. But there’s no way to tell exactly how big your puppy will grow to be.

Genetics can play a large role in determining how big your dog will get. If both parents are small, then you can expect your puppy to be on the smaller side as well. However, if both parents are large dogs, then you may have a larger puppy on your hands!

The other factor that will affect your dog ‘s size is his environment. Puppies who are given plenty of food and water and allowed to exercise often grow into much bigger dogs than those who are not given enough food or exercise while they’re young.

For example, if you have two puppies — one who gets plenty of food and water and has plenty of time each day for exercise and one who doesn’t — the one who eats well and exercises often will likely grow up to be much bigger than the other puppy did when they were young!

Using our puppy weight calculator is easy. To find out how much your puppy will weigh as an adult, just do the following:

  1. Enter your puppy’s age in weeks, days, or months
  2. Enter your puppy’s current weight in pounds or kilograms
  3. Click the calculate button

​​A puppy weight calculator can help you determine the size of your puppy at any point in time. It’s a useful tool, but it won ‘t always be accurate.

The calculator is based on an average growth curve for puppies. The results will be more accurate if you enter your dog’s weights every week or so, instead of just entering one weight and hoping that it remains accurate throughout his life.

The calculator will give you a general idea of what to expect from your puppy as he grows up. However, there are many factors that can affect his size, including genetics and environment.

A puppy weight calculator It’s a tool that estimates the size of your puppy, based on its age. The weight calculator will tell you how big your puppy will be when it reaches its full adult height. This is particularly useful if you ‘re buying or adopting a puppy and want to know how big it will be when it matures. 

It can also help you decide whether you have enough space for an adult dog of that breed or size.

However, even though their accuracy isn’t perfect, we still think they ‘re very useful tools because they give us a good idea about our dogs’ future size and helps us plan accordingly!

​​At six months of age, most small dog breeds will have reached a significant milestone in their growth and development. They will have already reached a significant portion of their final adult size, typically around 60%. This means that if a small dog breed is expected to reach an adult weight of 10 pounds,  at six months they will likely weigh around 6 pounds.

Medium-to-large-breed puppies, on the other hand, may not have reached their full size yet, but they will have made significant progress. They may have reached two-thirds of their final adult weight at this point. For example, if a medium-to-large-breed dog is expected to reach an adult weight of 50 pounds, they may weigh around 33 pounds at six months.

For giant breeds, they may still have a ways to go to reach their full size, but they will have made substantial progress by six months of age. At this point , they will likely be around half of their final adult weight. For example, if a giant breed dog is expected to reach an adult weight of 150 pounds, they may weigh around 75 pounds at six months.

As the puppies continue to grow, by nine months of age, they will have grown to 90% of their final size. This means that a small dog breed will be close to reaching their final adult weight, medium-to-large-breed puppies will be very close, and giant breeds will have made significant progress.

Finally, by 12 months of age, most puppies will have reached their full adult size and weight. This is the point at which they will have completed their growth and development, and will maintain their size and weight for the rest of their lives. However , it is worth noting that some breeds may continue to fill out and gain muscle mass even after 12 months.

On average, small breed puppies tend to reach their full height and weight between 6 and 8 months of age. Medium breed puppies typically reach their full height between 12 and 15 months,  but may take up to 18 months to reach their full weight. Large and giant breed puppies usually reach their full height by 18 months, but may take up to 3 years to reach their full weight. 

It ‘s important to note that these are just averages and individual puppies may reach full height and weight at different times. Factors such as diet, exercise, and genetics can all play a role in a puppy’s growth and development. Additionally, it is important to consult with a veterinarian or professional trainer to get a more accurate idea of when a specific puppy will reach their full height and weight.

Puppies typically double their weight in the first 1-2 weeks of life. This rapid growth is due to the fact that puppies are born with a very low birth weight and need to grow quickly to survive. After this initial growth spurt,  small breed puppies may gain around 5oz per week and large breed puppies may gain around 10oz per week. This rate of growth will slow down as the puppy gets older and approaches their full grown weight.

To estimate a puppy’s full-grown weight, one can use the formula Adult weight = (Puppy weight / Puppy age in weeks) * 52, or simply double their weight at 6 months of age. However, it ‘s important to note that these methods are just estimates and individual puppies may reach their full weight at different times. 

Factors such as diet, exercise, and genetics can all play a role in a puppy’s growth and development. Additionally, it is important to consult with a veterinarian or professional trainer to get a more accurate idea of when a specific puppy will reach their full weight.

It’s also worth mentioning that some breeds are more prone to obesity, in such cases, it’s important to be mindful of their diet and exercise routine to ensure a healthy growth.

Generally, puppies of all sizes should be gaining around 1 to 2 grams of weight per day per kilogram of expected adult weight per day. That roughly translates to around 0.25 to 0.5 ounces per pound of expected weight per week.

This is a general guideline and it’s important to note that different breeds have different growth patterns and rates, and individual puppies may have different needs. Additionally, factors such as diet, exercise, and genetics can all play a role in a puppy ‘s growth and development.

So, for small breed puppies whose adult weight will be 10 pounds, that means that your puppy should be gaining 2.5 to 5 ounces of weight per week. On the other hand, your large breed puppy whose adult weight is around 75 pounds should be gaining 18.75 to 37.50 ounces per week – about 1.17 to 2.34 pounds.

Additionally, it’s important to monitor your puppy’s overall health and well-being, as rapid weight gain can be a sign of underlying health issues. A veterinarian can also help you to monitor your puppy’s weight and growth, and to make adjustments to their diet and exercise routine as needed.

​​To estimate your puppy’s full-grown weight,  you can use a puppy weight calculator. This calculator uses a simple formula: Adult weight = (Puppy weight / Puppy age in weeks) * 52. But keep in mind that there are many factors that can affect a puppy’s weight when they’re full-grown, such as breed,  gender, and genetics.

​​It’s hard to say for sure how much your puppy will weigh when they’re grown up because it depends on a lot of things. Different breeds of dogs have different average weights, and your puppy ‘s weight can also be affected by things like their diet and exercise.

It’s hard to say exactly what the usual weight is for a 12-week-old puppy because different breeds of dogs can weigh very different amounts. For example,  some small dog breeds might weigh less than 12 pounds, while some giant dog breeds can weigh over 100 pounds. To get an idea of what ‘s normal for your puppy’s breed, you can look at weight categories for different breeds.

A puppy’s paw size isn’t a perfect way to tell how big they’ll be, but it can give you an idea. If your puppy has really big paws compared to the rest of their body,  it might mean they have more growing to do.

​​It depends on what breed of dog your puppy is and how big they’ll get. Small dog breeds usually stop growing between 6 and 8 months old,  but it can take large dog breeds up to 18 months to reach their full size. Some puppies may stop growing earlier or later than others due to genetics or nutrition.

Bottom Line

​​In conclusion, our dog weight calculator is a valuable tool for any dog owner who wants to understand their pup’s growth and development. By inputting your puppy’s current weight and breed, you can receive an estimate of their future adult size, weight, and height. 

This can help you prepare for your dog ‘s future needs and ensure that you provide them with the best possible care. 

We hope you found the dog size estimator helpful and informative,  and we encourage you to share it with your friends and family who also have dogs. 

Thank you for visiting our website page and we hope to see you again soon!

References:

American Kennel Club, Breed Weight Chart, https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/breed-weight-chart/

American Kennel Club: When Does My Puppy Finish Growing? https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/when-does-my-puppy-finish-growing/